Farm Update: Summer Arrives

A beautiful summer evening wraps a purple light along the shore of Lily Springs. 

A beautiful summer evening wraps a purple light along the shore of Lily Springs. 

When I first moved here, I had no idea how quickly this land (and the lake it surrounds) would transform so quickly. The sun has just now passed through the Northern Solstice, bringing with it the longest day of the year (June 21st), and heralding the shorter winter days that approach. In what seems like an explosion of light and growth, sound and color, our land has transformed into a lush ecosystem, teaming with life. Here are a few updates about what's been happening here lately:

• Animals: Three weeks ago we brought a new worker to the farm: a guardian dog named Aldo. While often barking and hard to spot, Aldo is a work dog and who is always doing his job. He is here to guard and protect the eight male goats that make up our Boy Band. They are all busy chewing away at the buckthorn, prickly ash, and poison ivy in our Red Pine plantation. The goats are named: Curly, Moe, Larry, Pinky, Forrest, Haoka, Jeremy, and Fancy Boy. 

The goats and me (Eli) hanging out by the fallen (but living) willow tree in their permanent paddock. The goats love willow for its tasty leaves and the fresh growth tissue in its bark. 

The goats and me (Eli) hanging out by the fallen (but living) willow tree in their permanent paddock. The goats love willow for its tasty leaves and the fresh growth tissue in its bark. 

• On the first of June we planted about a thousand asparagus crowns (roots), a delicious perennial crop that will always play an important role in our operation. That same day, we had a team of helping hands plant a hedge of trees across our field. Over the next months, we will continue the ongoing planting process of other perennial crops (plants that will continue to produce fruit, nuts, and berries long into the future, on a yearly basis), as investments in the long-term resilience of this landscape. Perennials have deep roots and sturdy structures to survive long winters and hot summers; for this reason, all major crops at LSF are perennials.

Asparagus is transplanted into the long rows that cut West-East across our North field. Straw bales will be spread over the asparagus to help them retain moisture in the hot summer days.

Asparagus is transplanted into the long rows that cut West-East across our North field. Straw bales will be spread over the asparagus to help them retain moisture in the hot summer days.

• There is so much going on here at the farm, including our third annual WILD SPRINGS      FESTIVAL on August 22nd/23rd. Pick up your tickets HERE ! 

• We will be posting about lots more as the summer continues. STAY TUNED!