Building the South Field Fence

Tyler and Bryan shovel and tamp the soil around one of about 200 Red Pine posts in the South field.

Tyler and Bryan shovel and tamp the soil around one of about 200 Red Pine posts in the South field.

This week, we started building a 2600 ft. long, 8 ft. high, wire fence in our South field. We are building this fence as a long-term protective barrier for our hazelnut tree plantation. The field is approximately five acres within the fence line (shown dotting edge of the field). With adequate maintenance and careful use we will be able to keep animals and important plants safe for decades to come. 

These plans, designed by Paula Westmoreland of Ecological Gardens and drawn by Jim Barmore of Harrier GeoGraphics, show a preliminary layout of our hazelnut operations. 

These plans, designed by Paula Westmoreland of Ecological Gardens and drawn by Jim Barmore of Harrier GeoGraphics, show a preliminary layout of our hazelnut operations. 

In the next couple of weeks we will have a small herd of cattle (about ten) living in the South field; it will be the first time there have been animals on these fields in at-least 30 yrs. Cattle are an excellent land-management tool because they aerate the soil with their hooves, they mow the grass and trim the hedges everywhere they go, and their waste adds important nutrients directly to the soil. Cows (and other grazing animals like sheep) help to return organic matter to degraded lands, mostly through their intricate digestion and decomposition of plant-matter which is then left behind to fertilize our plants. 

We'll post more updates on the ongoing South field fence project will be up here next week.